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Traditions Cause the Joy of Easter to Linger — 12 Comments

  1. Janis,
    As I read your post it brought to mind how in our lives we also lose the softness and compliance when we are busy with things and not practicing life in the presence of the Savior. Then when we find realize our dryness sometimes it takes a bit of time of practice to get back that softness and sweetness of relationship. Oh the Grace of God that calls us to walk with him daily.
    And when we return He welcomes us to enjoy that soft and sweet delight again.
    Just thought I’d share my thoughts on your words.
    Love you dear sister.

    • What a great analogy, Julie! Our Lord is so gracious in welcoming us back when we’re dry due to lack of contact with Him. He restores us and makes our relationship with Him fresh again. Love you, too, Julie.

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

    • Anita, thank you for stopping by. I love fresh baked bread, too. Slather the warmth with butter, and I, too, could probably pass up some sweet thing.

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

  2. It’s always interesting to learn about different traditions and the Easter bread looks lovely! I have Fiddler On The Roof in my head now too – it doesn’t take much to get a tune going in my mind!

    • Hi Lesley,

      It’s fun to learn about other culture’s traditions and celebrations. Thank you for the compliment on my Easter bread. I actually tried a piece this morning and it was yummier than the first day! I guess good things happen in the waiting (and the fridge). Love that “Fiddler on the Roof” is running through your mind. That’s called an “earworm,” in case you never heard that term before. My hubby is the music specialist in our home.

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

    • Hi Paula,

      I’m glad you enjoyed the article! I’ll have to hop over to your site.

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

  3. I tried making fresh bread during 2020 and found I loved doing it. There is something therapeutic about the mixing, kneading, and then aroma that brought me comfort and peace. Your Easter bread looks lovely and of course, I love seeing these Italian recipes and traditions.

    • Hi Joanne,

      Oh, I know what you mean about the aroma of making bread. Even in the kneading and rising, there’s that flavorful yeasty aroma. And when it comes out of the oven, it’s even more heavenly. I’m glad you found the process of making bread therapeutic last year. It seemed baking helped a lot of people last year! I’m so glad we share in this heritage. Thank you for your compliment on the bread. This morning, I had a piece straight from the fridge…and it tasted better than on Easter morning. Something about the waiting (spiritual reflection?).

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

  4. Oh, how I want to try this, Janis! Sometimes things don’t turn out right – but He doesn’t want us to give up! I’m looking forward to seeing you make them – and happily dunk them in your coffee! What a beautiful tradition!

    • Hi Maryleigh, You should really try making this! You are such a fantastic baker of many yummy goodies. I’m sure this would turn out great for you as well. Just use the plain confectioner’s sugar, milk, and vanilla for a light glaze. Much better.
      I’m determined to try again. I love this tradition so steeped in family memories with my Mom and rich in spiritual meaning. While searching the internet for clues as to what might have gone wrong with my bread, I ran across a site called, “There’s an Italian in my kitchen.” She mentioned another symbolism in this particular loaf of bread. After the second kneading, when all the fruit and extras are added, the bread is divided and rolled into two long ropes. Then the ropes are braided and formed into a wreath. That wreath form represents the crown of thorns on Jesus’ head. I forgot to put that in the very long post.
      Thank you for coming by.

      From My Heart to Yours,
      Janis

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